Posts Tagged ‘social networks’

MySpace Investigations Basics: Some Background

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009

A senior detective in Corona (California), Frank Zellers first realized the power of MySpace evidence during a 2006 homicide investigation. The suspect had a MySpace page, and not only were investigators able to recover current photos and intelligence from the site’s internal messaging system, they were also able to identify his location.

“Under a court order, MySpace provided us with the suspect’s IP address and subscriber ID, which we were then able to tie to his physical address,” says Zellers. “We watched him log in at 1 a.m., and we had him in custody nine hours later.”

That experience led Zellers to create an investigations course around MySpace, one that was designed not for task force members or computer forensic examiners, but for “novice” investigators. “For our basic class, we set up accounts to show the site’s internal functionality,” he says. “We show the students things like determining whether an image was uploaded to the site, or is embedded from another site. That helps them figure out where to serve search warrants.”

The “MySpace Investigations Basics” webinar grew out of that course. Zellers will discuss the site’s functionality, different ways to find different kinds of evidence, and how to save it, along with how advanced searches via Google and Yahoo figure into an investigation.

He’ll also cover how investigation of a MySpace page translates into investigation of other sites. “vBulletin forum software is very prevalent among the more obscure social networks,” he explains, “like the bulletin boards that host communities of online gamers, hard-core rappers, and others.”

That’s because many social networks retain the same general features which MySpace pioneered, including profile pages, comment space for friends, private messaging, and ability to share images and videos.

This varies by site—MySpace is more versatile than Facebook or Twitter—and the way the features are cataloged change, so investigators must take care to keep current with what each site does.

They should also stay up-to-date on site demographics. MySpace, with its longtime reputation for being a teen hangout, remains more popular among young people than Facebook, which is popular among older generations.

More social networks are also moving toward integration. MySpace, for instance, has partnered with Skype, a Voiceover IP application which allows both instant messaging and voice communications between members. A MySpace member can therefore IM a Skype user. (Zellers notes, however, that the chat conversation is archived on the user’s machine rather than on MySpace servers, making it a computer forensic job.)

Just because the MySpace user interface is complicated to adult eyes doesn’t mean plenty of evidence can’t be recovered and used either as intelligence, or to solve crimes—even in unexpected ways, as Zellers’ team discovered. And the continued popularity of social networking sites both new and old means investigators need to have these skills sooner rather than later.

Christa M. Miller is Vere Software’s marketing/public relations consultant. She specializes in law enforcement and public safety and can be reached at christa at christammiller dot com.