Posts Tagged ‘IP tracing’

So you thought Tor was bad enough. Check out Tor’s Hidden Web Services.

Monday, July 25th, 2011

Recently and article appeared at NPR titled “Senators Target Internet Narcotics Trafficking Website Silk Road”. I only bothered to hit the link because I saw it mentioned on the website Anit-forensics.com. The short article complained of drugs blatantly sold on the Internet and something needed to be done about it and Congress is going to solve that one for us. Although selling drugs on the Internet is nothing new, the place on the Internet “openly” selling drugs was on the Tor network through the use of Tor’s “Hidden Services” function.  The “Silk Road” is an online market open for the sale of goods and named after the ancient road used to bring goods from the orient to the west.

For the power user of the Tor network Hidden Services is probably nothing new. For the average online investigator though you may have heard of Tor and may have even tried to use it (especially of you read my last article on using Tor in your investigations). But were you aware that webpages can be hidden within the Tor network? Have you ever seen a .onion domain name? if you haven’t then read on.

Hidden services were introduced to the Tor network in 2004. Tor’s Hidden Services are run on a Tor client using special server software. This “Hidden Service” uses a pseudo top-level-domain of “.onion”. Using this domain, the Tor network routes traffic through its network without the use of IP addresses.

To get to these hidden services you must be using the Tor Network and have your browser enable to use Tor.  How do you find sites using the hidden services? Start at the core…

http://eqt5g4fuenphqinx.onion/ 

Welcome to .onion Welcome to .onion

Core.onion according to its hidden services site has been in the network since 2007.

Once in the Core.onion you find a simple directory to start exploring Hidden Services on the Tor network.

TorDir TorDir

TorDir is a directory of Hidden Services. It gives you access to a variety of sites that offer instant messaging services, email, items for sale, social media type sites and marketplaces.

Black Market Black Market

 

In the markets a variety of things are for sale, most look to be illegal though. File sharing also looks to be popular and can be found in several .onion sites.

File Sharing File Sharing

 

To make purchases bitcoin seems to be the most popular virtual currency and is regularly mentioned throughout the .onion sites.

Bitcoin Bitcoin

 

Another good location to start finding out about what Tor’s Hidden Services have to offer is a wiki located at:

http://xqz3u5drneuzhaeo.onion/users/hackbloc/index.php/Mirror/kpvz7ki2v5agwt35.onion/Main_Page

 

Also, if you are an IRC fan Tor hidden services can be used there also. The Freenode website gives the instructions on how to access Freenode IRC servers on Tor’s Hidden Services.

If you are interested in learning more about Tor’s Hidden Services here are a few sites that can get you on your way:

http://www.onion-router.net/Publications/locating-hidden-servers.pdf

http://www.irongeek.com/i.php?page=videos/tor-hidden-services

http://www.torproject.org/docs/tor-hidden-service.html.en

 

Not to make it any worse but if you have not heard Ip2 (another anonymizing network that is becoming increasingly popular) also has its own “eeepsites” similar to the Hidden Services offered in Tor that a user can post content to like a website.

Hidden Services are going to increasingly become a location that will be misused by many. It will also become a place on the Internet that investigators will need to become increasingly familiar with if they are to further their online investigations.

Six Online Tools for Tracing IP Addresses

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010

Tracing IP addresses is a fundamental skill for online investigations. Several resources are available on the Internet to assist in this process. Several online resources for doing your basic IP identification include:

ARIN – American Registry of Internet Numbers
ARIN is a Regional Internet Registry (RIR) that provides services related to the technical coordination and management of Internet number resources in its respective service region. The ARIN service region includes Canada, many Caribbean and North Atlantic islands, and the United States.

Use the “Search Whois” function at  https://www.arin.net/index.html  to obtain IP registration information.

Sam Spade
Sam Spade has been in use as a tool for obtaining domain registration information for years. It has a simple Google like interface where you enter an IP address or a domain name.

http://samspade.org/
DNS Stuff
This is another website that has been around for a number of years. This website offers both free and pay for option for assisting in the identification IP addresses and other online information.

http://www.dnsstuff.com/tools/tools/
Network-Tools.com
Another website with a simple user interface to assist in IP tracing.

http://network-tools.com/
Central Ops.net
Central Ops is another website that assists with your IP tracing. One of its features “Domain Dossier” does multiple lookups on an IP address or domain.
http://centralops.net/co/
Internet Investigators Toolbar
All of these websites are easily accessible from our free to the online investigations community Internet Investigators toolbar which can be found on our website at http://veresoftware.com/index.php?page=downloads#toolbar

Tracing IP Addresses: Some Background

Wednesday, October 14th, 2009
Tools like traceroute show the many data packet paths across the Internet.

Tools like traceroute show the many data packet paths across the Internet.

Everyone uses the Internet, says Gary Kessler, instructor of upcoming “Tracing IP Addresses” webinar—but few people understand how it actually works. And while investigators don’t need to know how the telephone system works to get a warrant for phone records or even wiretapping, the Internet is far more complex–but far more accessible to the investigator.

“Computer forensics starts ‘under the hood’,” he explains. The investigator must know about file allocation tables, storage space on a hard drive or other digital device, and so forth, before being able to use the appropriate tool to recover evidence.

And because the Internet figures into so many forensic examinations—those involving child pornography, cyber bullying and harassment, etc.—it is one of the working parts “under the hood.” “No longer are there standalone computers,” says Kessler, “so conducting online investigations involves the application of some forensic principles.”

Tying digital evidence to individuals

These include both legal and technical aspects. “Investigators need to be able to understand the networking clues left on the computer,” says Kessler, “such as where to look, and how the clues can mislead. For example, the email header doesn’t prove who sent the email, but it can indicate where the email came from.”

In fact, he adds, everything in digital forensics is about finding patterns of behavior. “When taken together, those patterns can lead a reasonable person to what a suspect did,” says Kessler. “Digital forensics provides exculpatory or incriminating information which might take an investigation in a direction it may not otherwise have gone.”

In the case of IP tracing, this can even include geolocation. “An IP address can provide a general location from where an individual accessed email, for example,” says Kessler. “In one homicide investigation, this was key when the suspect denied an email account was his. Not only was the account established as his, but the IP addresses also showed the account being accessed from locations which coincided with his business trip calendar.”

Seeing evidence from every angle

Kessler says there are few misunderstandings about IP address tracing, but that investigators don’t always correctly interpret the evidence. “As an example, a traceroute showing data packets going from Point A to Point B will show a different set of addresses than the packets going back from Point B to Point A,” he explains, “which could be interpreted as a completely different route. The investigator has to know how to interpret the information, which is simply the same route being reported in a different way.”

The takeaways from Kessler’s webinar: how IP addresses relate back to online activities, along with tools that show how addresses relate to Web domains, how the domains relate to individuals, and how IP addresses relate to geographical locations.

In addition, Kessler will cover how criminals use the same tools. “An investigator uses the tools in a criminal case, but a hacker uses them to discover vulnerabilities,” he explains. So in all, while IP address tracing may seem trivial, it is important in any case with a networking component.

Learn more: register for the Tracing IP Addresses webinar today!

Christa M. Miller is Vere Software’s marketing/public relations consultant. She specializes in law enforcement and public safety and can be reached at christa at christammiller dot com.

Image: curiouslee via Flickr