Posts Tagged ‘Greek Forensic Blog’

The European Union Implements a Cybercrime strategy

Monday, February 23rd, 2009

Although this is from December it is of interest in the U.S. considering our current changes in administration. It was widely reported and most recently as last week from the Greek Forensic Community blog, that, the Council of ministers of the European Union adopted, a “strategy to reinforce the fight against cyber crime.” It is interesting that the country that developed the technology to connect the world is being outpaced in its ability to respond to the crime committed through its growing adolescent by others around the world. They wrote that the strategy should include ” the means of combating the traditional forms of crime committed via the Internet, such as identity fraud, identity theft, fraudulent sales, financial offences, illicit trading on the Internet, particularly narcotics and arms dealing.”

Current U.S. policy tends to deal with only the protection of the infrastructure and not the entire problem surrounding Cybercrime and its deleterious effects on the state of the Internet and our economy. Education about the problem and enforcement actions against the offenders works and should be supported and implemented nationwide.

What are extremely interesting in the EU proposal are the measures that would include “Cyber Patrols”, “Joint investigative Teams” and “Remote Searches”. All of these are a step in the right direction. The EU is also funding Europol to set up a crime reporting system to track Internet crimes that can be accessed by the EU members. This too will aid in the response if law enforcement understands the effective of the crime and can respond accordingly.

The EU’s strategy marks a leap in the acknowledgment of the magnitude of the Cybercrime problem at least in the European Union. In addition their strategy suggests closer cooperation and information exchange between law enforcement authorities and the private sector. This has been a stalwart strategy by many in the U.S. especially those belonging to organizations like the High Technology Crime Investigation Association.

As we have commented before the U.S. now needs to consider the same type of strategy. Cybercrime continues to grow and law enforcement’s skills to investigate it, and the national strategy to deal with it, need to be as sophisticated as the crimes committed.

The new “Cyber Czar” in the U.S. should consider the EU’s strategy early and adopt similar policy for U.S. law enforcement.