Posts Tagged ‘Electronic Crime and Digital Evidence Recovery grant’

Data retention vs. criminal anonymizer use

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011

This week, German authorities released data suggesting that Internet Service Provider (ISP) data retention policies – which the United States hopes to implement – could actually have a negative impact on online crime fighting.

Why? As the article puts it:

This is because users began to employ avoidance techniques, says AK Vorrat. A plethora of options are available to those who do not want their data recorded, including Internet cafés, wireless Internet access points, anonymization services, public telephones and unregistered mobile telephone cards.

The European Union is looking at policy changes that protect both privacy and public safety. In the meantime, however, we know that “hard core” criminals will continue to use anonymization technology, and it will take more than policy to address this.

That’s why we’re pleased to announce that the National Institute of Justice has awarded us funding under its Electronic Crime and Digital Evidence Recovery grant. The funding is for the development of forensic and investigative tools and techniques to investigate criminal use of Internet anonymizers – tools that law enforcement doesn’t currently have.

We’ll be working in conjunction with researchers at the University of Nevada’s Department of Computer Science and Engineering on the development, while investigators from the Washoe County Sheriff’s Department will test the software and offer their feedback. Meanwhile, we’d love to hear from you. What has your experience been trying to investigate online crime despite anonymizers?