Posts Tagged ‘cyberstalking’

Twitter is officially now Creepy

Tuesday, April 5th, 2011

Okay, this is a play on words, but it really is getting creepy. Yiannis Kakavas, social media fanatic and software writer, has published a new free tool to scare the pants off of any sane Twitterphile. But if you are updating your Twitter page that much, you probably won’t really care.

Kakavas’s new tool, “Creepy,” is a social networking search tool — or in his words, a “geolocation information aggregator.” But unlike just any search, Creepy searches for where you have posted from, then figures out the posts’ longitude and latitude and makes a pretty map of where you have posted from each time. Can you say “stalker nirvana”?

Now this requires that you have turned on Twitter’s own geolocation service, or used some device (your smartphone) or web service (Foursquare, Gowalla, etc.) that collects your lat/long when you are posting. So, Kakavas’ tool is not collecting anything you haven’t already put online yourself. It just makes it easy for the investigator to get to.

Well, as I have posted before, where there is a great tool for stalkers there is a great tool for investigators. So let’s take a look at this new investigative tool.

CREEPY

Again, this is a simple to use tool. Go to the download page and download the Windows Executable or the Ubuntu version and install on your operating system. The Windows installer is quick and easy and it will have you investigating in no time.

Start Creepy and in the settings authorize it to use your Twitter account. (You do need a Twitter account, but many investigators set up accounts purely for investigative purposes.) Now you can search Twitter users or Flickr users, along with photos from many other online applications. I searched both and easily found the users I was looking for.

Then click on the big “Geolocate Target” button. Under the “Map View” tab, the found lat/long coordinates will be displayed, along with their location on a mapping tool of your choice (there are several different mapping tools, including Google, to choose from).

It may take a few minutes to complete the search, but the results can be very revealing. Just as call detail records from cell phones can help investigators map out a suspect’s or victim’s movements over a period of weeks – including their normal patterns, and departures from normal – Creepy’s maps can show patterns of behavior with regard to social networks. The longer you track these patterns, the better picture you will have of your target.

It’s that simple… or it’s that Creepy.

Do you use Creepy? What have your experiences been?